Category Archives: investigator

ICORP Investigations Now Licensed In 11 States

ICORP Investigations continue to grow throughout the United States. ICORP Investigations specialize in surveillance. Investigations include workers compensation investigations, high liability claims investigations, cheating spouse investigations and disability investigations. For more information please visit our website. 

Here are the list of states ICORP Investigations private investigators are now licensed in.

State                                     License #

New York                             11000133551

New Jersey                           8387

Connecticut                          A-2566

Pennsylvania                       MD-0012931-2010

Maryland                             106-4347

Georgia                                PDC002573

Florida                                 A 1200112

Texas                                   A18292

Arizona                               1631656

Nevada                                1762A

Colorado                             20121099045

Ask an Expert: All About Private Investigation

I just want to thank Lifehacker for inviting me to their Ask an Expert Q & A regarding private investigators. I also want to thank the people who participated in the chat session. I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did.

To read the transcript of the chat session, please head to Lifehacker

 
Regards,

Steven Santarpia

Private Investigators New York – Surveillance Specialists

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Private Investigators in NY specializing in surveillance investigations. Investigations include cheating spouse/infidelity, family law and insurance investigations. All surveillance video shot in crystal clear High Definition video. Also, our clients can view their surveillance video the very next day from our case management system. With so much riding on your investigation, why settle for anything less. Find out why we are an leader in the private investigation industry.

ICORP Investigations is licensed in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Colorado, Maryland and Florida.

Please visit our NYC Website. 

Computer Forensics New York

ICORP Investigations provide expert computer forensic investigations, e-discovery, and preventative forensics to businesses, individuals and attorneys worldwide.

Types of Cases

  • Wrongful termination lawsuits
  • Employee theft of trade secrets, customer/marketing/sales data
  • Copyright/patent/intellectual property infringement
  • Divorce and other family-law matters
  • Illegal internet activity or pornography
  • Sexual harassment lawsuits, threats, or hostile workplace claims
  • Use of business computers for personal work or outside ventures
  • Industrial espionage and software piracy
  • Breach of contract or violation of fiduciary duties

How can ICORP help you.

Photos: Inside The NYPD’s New “Domain Awareness” Surveillance HQ

By Christopher Robbins in  on August 8, 2012 5:10 PM

surveillance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This afternoon the NYPD debuted their “all-seeing” Domain Awareness System, which syncs the city’s 3,000 closed circuit camera feeds in Lower Manhattan, Midtown, and near bridges and tunnels with arrest records, 911 calls, license plate recognition technology, and even radiation detectors. Mayor Bloomberg dismissed concerns that this represented the most glaring example of Big Brother-style policing. “What you’re seeing is what the private sector has used for a long time,” Bloomberg said. “If you walk around with a cell phone, the cell phone company knows where you are…We’re not your mom and pop’s police department anymore.”

NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly stated that the system, which is currently operational out of the department’s Lower Manhattan Security Commission HQ, was developed with a “state of the art privacy policy” and “working with the privacy community,” but did not offer specifics. DAS does not have facial recognition technology at this time, but “it’s something that’s very close to being developed,” the mayor said.

The system was developed with Microsoft and paid for by the city for $30 to $40 million, and has already been in use for six months. The feeds compiled by the system are kept for thirty days, then erased.

In a live demonstration of DAS, the NYPD’s director of policy and planning for counterterrorism, Jennifer Tisch, showed reporters how the system responded to a recent report of a suspicious package. A description of the package (a closed “Jack Daniels” box) was shown next to its location. Video feeds within 500 feet of the package’s location that showed the location several minutes before the package was reported to police, so that the system’s operator could determine who or what placed the package there.

In another example, a radioactive isotope—Technetium-99—was detected and the officer at the helm is shown a description of the isotope. “I want to stress that this isotope has both medical and industrial uses,” Tisch said, before adding that it would be the officer’s judgement call as to whether the isotope meant that it was a terrorist threat or someone who had recently undergone “some sort of medical procedure,” as the mayor put it. “It takes some judgement to use technology,” Bloomberg added, presumably including on-the-spot radiography in his assertion.

Reports of suspicious cars can be followed up with license-plate scanners, which will track and beam back the location of the vehicle to the system so that the police can follow it in real-time—video feeds will also show delayed images to help the officers determine if the car is in a caravan. Arrest and driving records are shown alongside the camera image. “This system is the ultimate in domain awareness,” Tisch said.

Regarding the department’s recent request for information from Twitter for a threat made by one of its users, Kelly said that social media monitoring “is not done at this location,” and that “[The NYPD] only monitors social media for specific investigations. That’s the world we live in.”

The City will receive 30% on the profits Microsoft will make selling it to other cities, although Mayor Bloomberg declined to say if that money would go back into the NYPD. “Maybe we’ll even make a few bucks.”

Gothamist

Job Posting – Insurance Field Investigator (Maryland)

Part Time Surveillance Insurance Claims Investigator (With the possibility to work Full Time in the future.)

Duties: Video surveillance and report writing

Must own a vehicle with tinted windows, computer and high-definition camcorder.Candidate should have a clean record and no criminal history.Candidates should have a minimum of 2 years experience as a field investigator or college degree in Criminal Justice.

Candidate should have excellent report writing skills.

We cover all of Maryland. Investigators must be willing to travel.

Please submit cover letter and resume.

ICORP Investigations 

Job Posting – New York Insurance Field Investigator

Part Time Surveillance Insurance Claims Investigator  (With the possibility to work Full Time in the future.)

Must own a vehicle, computer and high-definition camcorder.

Candidate should have a clean record.

Candidates should have a minimum of 2 years experience as a field investigator.

Candidate should have excellent report writing skills.

Starting salary $18.00 an hour plus miles

Please send your resume to pi@icorpinvestigations.com. For more information, please visit our website ICORP Investigations Website. 

How To Divorce: How Do I Get Joint Custody?

Wondering how to get joint custody? Here’s what you need to know, from divorce lawyer Joseph E. Cordell, the author of the author of “Your Civil War: A Father’s Guide to Winning Child Custody” and “The 10 Stupidest Mistakes Men Make When Facing Divorce.” Have questions? Ask in the comments.

If you are about to begin a child custody case, you need to familiarize yourself with the phrase “the best interests of the child.”

Almost every state determines child custody and parenting time issues based on the “best interests of the child” standard.

State statutes and case law define this standard differently, but in general there are certain factors and themes that appear in the majority of states.

Child Custody Laws: How Does Your State Decide Custody?

In general, factors in the child custody analysis will include your relationship with your children and your spouse, who the primary caregiver was during your marriage, the length of time the child has lived in a stable, satisfactory environment and the desirability of maintaining continuity, the moral fitness of the parties involved, the home, school, and community record of the child, and any other factor considered by the court to be relevant to your family.

The best advice anyone could give a dad preparing for a custody battle is to become as active as possible in the lives of your children and to document everything.

Throughout the divorce process, realize that the court will evaluate your behavior in its entirety, taking into account not only the facts of the case, but also your demeanor. Irrational and aggressive behavior may have a profoundly detrimental effect on your case, so be mindful of your actions throughout the proceedings.

My most recent book “The 10 Stupidest Mistakes Men Make When Facing Divorce” illustrates common blunders dads make that adversely affect their custody chances (e.g., moving out of the home, neglecting the children, etc.).

A crucial aspect that a dad frequently overlooks is the need to at least have joint legal custody if he is not likely to obtain primary physical custody of the child. Legal custody refers to a parent’s decision-making rights regarding a child’s health, education, and welfare. By exercising the veto power granted by joint legal custody, the dad can put the brakes on unilateral decisions the mom may be inclined to make respecting major issues.

In the absence of primary physical custody, joint legal custody becomes an important mechanism to prevent the mom from reducing the father to a child support ATM and glorified every-other-weekend babysitter.

Joseph Cordell is the Principal Partner of Cordell & Cordell, a nationwide domestic litigation firm focused on men’s family law matters. Cordell & Cordell also provides a website dedicated to informing men on the divorce process and the challenges they face. Visit dadsdivorce.com for more information.

How To Divorce: How Can I Win In Divorce Court?

Wondering how you can win your divorce case? Here’s what you need to know, from divorce lawyer J. Richard Kulerski, the author of “The Secret to a Friendly Divorce: Your Personal Guide to a Cooperative, Out-of-Court Settlement.” Have questions? Ask in the comments.

There are no winners in a divorce battle; everyone loses. Make no mistake about it. Here’s why:

1. Our legal system cannot give you more than you have when you enter it.
2. No matter what you have when you enter the system, you will leave with less.
3. And this is before the lawyers get a dime.

These are absolute truths. You do not want to go to a divorce trial, unless there is no alternative, i.e. when it is a last resort.

Those who must take their cases to court want or need something that their soon-to-be ex will not agree to give them. Since they are unable to persuade their partner to agree to a mutually acceptable compromise, they have no alternative but to ask that a judge determine who will give or get what.

In order to obtain a result that is better than what your spouse has offered, you must be able to prove a set of facts that warrant a finding in your favor, and you must have the law on your side. You must also resist the temptation to say or do something to shoot yourself in the foot, e.g. act in a way that could make the judge think less of you. This last part is where you have some control over the outcome.

Remember that once the trial starts, the only person you must convince is the judge. Let your lawyer worry about the evidence, the law, and the overall delivery of your case. Your job in the courtroom is to do what you can to present yourself as a reasonable, good, and credible person.

With this in mind, do not grimace, roll your eyes, or use body language to suggest that whoever is testifying on your spouse’s behalf is lying. Do not make faces if you hear something you do not agree with, and do not pass notes to your lawyer when he or she is addressing the court or questioning a witness.

Make things easier on yourself by accepting that your sense of justice or fairness will not dictate the outcome. It is the law that counts, not your personal beliefs.

Accept the law that applies in your case as it is, and not as you wish it to be.

Have faith in your lawyer and take his or her advice, whether you agree with it or not.

Private Investigator Bill Raises Some Concerns

Private investigator bill raises some concerns.

By Michael McFall

Standard-Examiner staff

Mon, 03/26/2012 – 6:22am

SALT LAKE CITY — Lt. Lee Perry of the Utah Highway Patrol has reservations about Senate Bill 210 that gives new powers to private investigators.

The bill passed the Legislature but has yet to be signed by Gov. Gary Herbert. SB 210 would allow private agencies such as law firms and real estate companies to hire private investigators to serve all civil processes, including vacate and eviction notices, bench warrants, summonses and subpoenas. These are responsibilities that are now done by constables or law enforcement officers.

“They’re not trained in the same way as officers,” said Perry, who is also a state representative from Box Elder County and voted against the bill.

Many private investigators are former officers who know how to handle those situations, but under current state law, anyone who wants to be an investigator doesn’t have to take police training, “and that’s the hang-up,” Perry said.

Perry wonders what happens when people who don’t understand the recipient’s basic constitutional rights act inappropriately. If a resident or the investigators end up having to call law enforcement to assist in the situation, he questions what the bill really accomplishes.

The bill faced stiff opposition in the Senate, but passed 16-12 after sponsor Sen. Stephen Urquhart, R-St. George, added that the investigators cannot make arrests when serving a bench warrant.

Rep. Lowry Snow, R-St. George, sponsored the bill in the House and made sure to include a provision that investigators cannot use any force or breach the peace in performing these duties.

“It is true that (private investigators) have not been through the same training that a police officer will go through or a constable,” Snow said. “But they are regulated by the state Department of Professional Licensing and must adhere to the rules and regulations of that agency.”

In the House, Perry added a requirement that the investigators have to identify themselves and state that they’re acting as process servers, carry visible credentials and provide their contact information.

He also changed the bill so that if a sheriff’s office receives a credible complaint about an investigator, the department can ban him or her from performing those duties in that county ever again.

“I tried to give as much protection as I possibly could,” Perry said.

The final version passed the House on the last night of the session by a 38-36 vote.

One local private investigator shares Perry’s concerns about the possible law.

Jeff Nelson, who has been a private investigator in North Salt Lake for almost 35 years, said the bill does not make much sense to him. He’s been involved in at least 2,000 criminal cases and worries for the investigator’s safety while serving warrants. Sometimes “you run into someone who is a bad guy,” he said.

It’s better to send someone into these situations who is more qualified, he said.

If the governor signs SB 210, Perry plans to work with Rep. Curtis Oda, R-Clearfield, over the coming months on a new bill that would further clarify what the investigators can and cannot do.

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