Monthly Archives: June 2012

Dealing With The Paparazzi

The news is out — you’re getting a divorce. For many couples, breaking the news to friends and family is the toughest part of the process. How you go about it sets the stage for the future. Welcome your parents’ and well-meaning friends’ support, but stand firm. They should respect your privacy and not pry. Understand, however, that once the news is out, your divorce is in the public domain.

So what are you going to say when you get all those phone calls and emails?

Here are a few suggestions:

    • Script your responses to the obvious questions. Stick to the party line, and make sure your parents, kids, colleagues, etc. are on the same page in terms of what you want them to say.
    • Don’t make headlines by dumping on the in-law(s). You will do more damage than good by stoning his or her whole bloodline.
    • Think about your kids when you spread the news. Think about them again and again and again, and put yourself in their place.
    • Forget about private confidences. There is no such thing as “keep it under your hat.” Hats blow off in the wind.
    • Return phone calls when you aren’t angry or tired and likely to ramble.
    • Avoid daily updates.
    • Practice switch-hit topics. Have a ready list — the movie you saw, your vacation plans, your uncle’s hernia operation.
    • Practice deep breathing for those who want the itty-bitty details. There’s nothing like a long pause to get the point across. “I really don’t want to discuss this any further.”
    • Distract yourself. My aunt has a great technique. If you have to talk to someone who is going to get your goat, keep a coloring book handy and focus on staying within the lines.

Can’t keep from exploding or perseverating? Sit down and write (in long-hand) every nasty thought you ever had about the ex. Read the letter out loud (to yourself) and then put it in the safe deposit box for good.

Job Posting – Insurance Field Investigator (Maryland)

Part Time Surveillance Insurance Claims Investigator (With the possibility to work Full Time in the future.)

Duties: Video surveillance and report writing

Must own a vehicle with tinted windows, computer and high-definition camcorder.Candidate should have a clean record and no criminal history.Candidates should have a minimum of 2 years experience as a field investigator or college degree in Criminal Justice.

Candidate should have excellent report writing skills.

We cover all of Maryland. Investigators must be willing to travel.

Please submit cover letter and resume.

ICORP Investigations 

Why I Believe Marriage Shouldn’t Be Allowed Before Age 25

By Jennifer Nagy
6/4/12

Age is just a number… except when it comes to marriage.

Let’s look at my stats:
Current age – 29
Divorced for – 8 months
Separated for – 1 year, 9 months
Age when I met my ex – 19
Age when I married – 24

Which brings me to my point: couples should not be allowed to get married before age 25.

While I know that this statement is going to make me very unpopular with readers, I do believe that it would be for the best — better both for the institution of marriage and the individuals getting married — if we could change the law to prevent couples from getting married before the age of 25.

In my experience, marriage before 25 was not the smartest idea. I met my ex at the tender young age of 19 (just a few months after my birthday). I was enjoying the freedom of drinking and partying legally for the first time (I live in Canada where the drinking age is 19). I had yet to figure out who I was or what I wanted in my life. I was naïve and impressionable, and when I met my much older ex, I was perfectly happy to let him take control of my life, creating a relationship dynamic that continued for the nine years we were together.

We decided to get married when I was 24. It seemed like the right thing to do at the time because everyone knows that after five years, you should be married or at least engaged, right? It was definitely the message that I was getting from all of our friends. So we took the plunge, getting married on the beach in Miami Beach in front of our friends and family.

That’s where the problems began. Once the excitement of planning a beach wedding was over, after the suntan had faded, I was left simply living my life with my husband. Don’t get me wrong, I loved him — and a part of me always will. But because we had started dating at such a young age, he was marrying someone who had absolutely no idea who she was and what she wanted in her life. In short, it was a recipe for divorce.

People under the age of 25 are still discovering themselves; they are figuring out what is most important in their lives. They are discovering the joys (and heartache) of being in a relationship, and then the partying that often characterizes life between relationships. They are figuring out what their relationship “deal-breakers” are and who their most appropriate partners would be. While a person may be 100 percent certain that they love something — or someone — at the age of 21, by 29, they will most likely completely change their mind. Life is anything but certain.

My opinions are based solely on my personal experiences and the experiences of the people that I know and have observed. That being said, marriage and divorce statistics do support my claim. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, approximately 60 percent of marriages in which the couple marries between age 20 and 25 will end in divorce. A scary figure for young lovebirds… but definitely one that validates my opinion.

Who knows? Maybe there are 20-year-olds that get married and stay madly in love for their whole lives. Maybe puppy love can last forever.

Could be. Maybe there is such thing as fairies and unicorns too.

Just saying…

Huffington Post

Job Posting – P/T Field Investigator (NY & NJ Area)

Part Time Surveillance Insurance Claims Investigator (With the possibility to work Full Time in the future.)

Duties: Video surveillance and report writing

Must own a vehicle with tinted windows, computer and high-definition camcorder.Candidate should have a clean record and no criminal history.Candidates should have a minimum of 2 years experience as a field investigator or college degree in Criminal Justice.

Candidate should have excellent report writing skills.

We cover all of New York and New Jersey. Investigators must be willing to travel.

Please submit cover letter and resume.

ICORP Investigations Website 

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